Repositioning for Preventing and Treating Pressure Ulcers
Jun 11, 2015
Tissue closest to the bone may be the first tissue to undergo necrosis. Pressure ulcers are usually located over a bony prominence, such as the sacrum, heel, the greater trochanter, ischial tuberosity, fibular head, scapula, and ankle (malleolus).
Friction and shearing are also important factors in tissue ischemia, necrosis and pressure ulcer formation. 

Aims of repositioning:
1.Reduce or relieve the pressure on the area at risk
2.Maintain muscle mass & tissue integrity 
3.Ensure adequate blood supply
Regular repositioning prevents pressure ulcers by reducing the duration of pressure and shearing forces. 

Encourage adults who have been assessed as being: 
At risk of developing a pressure ulcer to change their position frequently and at least every 6 hours.     
At high risk of developing a pressure ulcer to change their position frequently and at least every 4 hours.                       
Rotational therapy may be effective in treating and preventing many of immobility patients.

References:
National Clinical Guideline Centre . (2014). Pressure ulcer prevention. The prevention and management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care. 
Stansby, G., Avital, L., Jones, K., & Marsden, G. (2014). Prevention and management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care: summary of NICE guidance. Bmj, 348, g2592.
http://www.leadingage.org/Turning_and_Repositioning_Program.aspx